Marble-ous ellipses images

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 1

Description: Geocentric model – the Earth lies at the centre of the Universe.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 2

Description: The apparent motion of Mars in the sky during retrograde motion. For an animation showing the motion of Mars in the night sky, see the Links section.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 3

Description: Epicycles can be used to explain retrograde motion.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 4

Description: Ptolemy’s full solution was incredibly complicated.

Credits: Public domain

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 5

Description: Copernicus’ heliocentric model of the Solar System.

Credits: Public domain

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 6

Description: Kepler made the revolutionary discovery that planetary orbits were elliptical.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 7

Description: Properties of an elliptical orbit, including the (semi-) major and (semi-) minor axes, and the locations of perihelion and aphelion.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 8

Description: The eccentricity of different ellipses. As eccentricity increases, an ellipse appears to be more ‘squashed’.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 9

Description: Photo of comet Hale-Bopp taken in Croatia.

Credits: Philipp Salzgeber

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 10

Description: Comet orbits in the Solar System.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 11

Description: The anatomy of a comet.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 12

Description: ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft performed a series of planetary ‘slingshots’ in order to reach its destination.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 13

Description: Four-image NAVCAM mosaic of Comet 67P/Churyumov Gerasimenko, using images taken on 19 September 2014 when Rosetta was 28.6 km from the comet.

Credits: ESA/Rosetta/NAVCAM

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 14

Description: The Philae lander will deliver unprecedented information about the surface and internal structure of a comet.

Credits: Spacecraft: ESA–J. Huart, 2014

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 15

Description: Automated Transfer Vehicle docked with The International Space Station.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 16

Description: The altitude range of the ISS over this period was higher than normal due to the enhanced re-boost capability of the ATV.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure 17

Description: Orbital reboost is a multi-step processes with 2 successive burns diametrically opposed to one another. The transition orbit is known as the Hohmann transfer orbit.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure A1

Description: Experiment setup. For instructions on how to construct the board, see Appendix: Elliptical board template instructions.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure A2

Description: Example table and graph.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure A3

Description: How the velocity vector (blue arrows) of a comet in orbit around the Sun changes with orbital position. The variation is due to the centripetal acceleration provided by the gravitational attraction of the Sun. The change in the comet tail is also shown.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure A4

Description: How the kinetic and potential energy of an orbiting body change with orbital position. The total energy will always remain constant.

Credits: ESA

P02 Marble-ous ellipses Figure X1

Description: Epicycles can be used to explain retrograde motion.

Credits: ESA

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